Brewery Summary
One of the most enterprising breweries in Belgium, Brouwerij Van Honsebrouck thrives on big ideas and it is reflected in their beers. In a brewing culture known for its subtlety and balance, Brouwerij Van Honsebrouck does not shy away from bringing explosive flavor to their recipes. One need only drink the famed Kasteel Rouge, a quadruple blended with cherries, to experience the essence of this brewery. Walking into their brewhouse feels like stepping into the future, but enter their on-site restaurant or pub and you will feel the classic Belgian values of hospitality and community that are essential to their success.

The History
The beginnings of brewery Van Honsebrouck can be traced to Werken, where Amandus Van Honsebrouck (1811-1865) was mayor and ran a farmstead with dairy farm, brewery and distillery.  He was married to Virginie Carbonnez with whom, like a good Catholic, he had no fewer than fourteen children, many of whom were destined to become active in the brewery trade.

The beginnings of brewery Van Honsebrouck can be traced to Werken, where Amandus Van Honsebrouck (1811-1865) was mayor and ran a farmstead with dairy farm, brewery and distillery.  He was married to Virginie Carbonnez with whom, like a good Catholic, he had no fewer than fourteen children, many of whom were destined to become active in the brewery trade.

For example, one daughter, Mathilde, married Hendrik Facon, a brewer in Ghent and Roeselare, while a son, Hypolyte, would become a managing brewer with Liefmans in Oudenaarde.

However, it  was anotherson, Emile (1844-1929), who in 1865 took over the parental brewery at the age of twenty-one following the sudden death of Amandus.  He succeeded his father not only as brewer, but also as mayor of Werken until the Liberals came to power in 1878.

In 1876, he married Ludovica Louise De Poorter, daughter of Franciscus, who ran a business in Ingelmunster which traded in cereals, coal and fertilizers.  The brewery world was not unfamiliar to her: one of her sisters, Mathilde, and her husband ran Claerhout brewery in that same village.   The young couple  went to live on the parental farm in Werken.  From the start, however, Louise and her mother-in-law did not get along, a situation which was compounded by the burden brought about by the thirteen still underage children.

Louise wanted at all costs to shake off the yoke of mother-in-law.  She went to see her brother Fredericus, who was a curate in Vichte, to pour out her troubles.  With his help, she set up her own brewery in Deerlijk, which would later  become Demeester brewery (closed down in 1955).  Her curate brother would bring in the customers.  The brewery was not a success, however, because the innkeepers preferred the beer brewed by Lust in Kortrijk (closed down in 1967) or by the brewery in Stasegem.  The brewery had no choice but to relocate to Toekomststraat in Kortijk.  In 1900, Mr. and Mrs. Honsebrouck-De Poorter eventually purchased a small farm on the outskirts of Ingelmunster, Louise’s native village, and established their brewery there under the name Sint-Jozef.